Thursday, November 30, 2006

Some of the marquees for shows that have closed are still up at the their theaters, and sometimes stay up for weeks and months. Not ours. Our marquee is gone, the posters are gone, the set is gone, the people are gone, and now I am soon to be gone. I doubt I will even walk past the theater again before I leave for LA. Too sad, too lonely, too empty. It is like we were never here at all. It wasn’t a week ago that I found out we would be closing and now there is nothing left. We’re yesterday’s news, this is not a unique situation to anyone but me.

Some show called “Darkness” is coming into the Helen Hayes. I think the title is appropriate. It kind of sums up the mood I am in. I wish them well.

Actually I am trying to be nice, I don’t care. The Darkness producers were hoping we would close so they could take over. They are now the darlings of business affairs, and it is their turn to be the Hayes flavor of the month. I won’t see that show. Don’t want to se it. Who cares, The romance and the affair are over; I don’t care who Helen is dating now.

I am finding it very difficult to participate in this Gypsy of the Year show. The number is great, the people are great, the event is great, but I don’t feel great. I feel like an outsider, an interloper, everyone else in the show is still in a show. I even wrote a self-deprecating joke on myself about closing. It gets a laugh. It is an old technique to get them laughing with you not at you. It is part of the job to smile through the tears, but it doesn’t mean it is easy, nor pleasant.

As you can tell, I am now experiencing the bitterness that is the next stage of this journey, It isn’t Helen’s fault, although it is very easy in this stage to find blame, I can find a reason to blame every thing and everyone including myself, but it doesn’t work. I just need to heal a little, and stay away from sharp objects and things that have a fuse or trigger.
As you were,
Jay

7 comments:

Pat Kelly said...

I noticed the same thing when I passed the theatre yesterday ... like you were never there. Yet, there are still several up for LeStat which has been closed for quite a while. But check the tourist pamphlets in various areas around the city. Your flyers are still there ... and you're still on several city buses. You didn't disappear, just busy with other things for now. Good luck!

the other one said...

You'll never really be gone because we will still share wonderful memories.

Anonymous said...

Jay:
Don't know if this helps, but I shared a similar experience. 10 years ago Simon & Schuster published a book I wrote to help people facing surgery. The editor was enthusiastic, the reviews were enthusiastic, letters from readers were enthusiastic, and the book sold a grand total of 5,000 copies. Barely a blip on publishing radar.

I was angry that the publisher had put no effort into promoting the book; they gave it a little push, and then turned their attention elswhere.

But then I realized that there were 5000 people whose surgical experience was greatly improved because they had read my book, whose lives were better because of me.

So, in the midst of the darkness, please don't forget that there are thousands of people whose lives are better because they "met" you. Thousands of people who have laughed for a few hours, thousands who know something about the wonders of ventriloquism who otherwise might have dismissed it without a thought. Thousands with fond memories, whether there is a marquee there to remind them or not.

Best to you, always. Now go out there and knock 'em dead!

Bob Baker

Ill Folks said...

Bob (above) does point you toward Bob (Dylan) who said, "Gotta change my way of thinking" which can help soothe things a little for you and your Bob.

Yes, thousands and thousands will keep their Playbills and their memories. Your show is VIVID to me. The reviewers appreciated your deft combo of lecture, "memory play" drama, and just plain fun, so I can just echo that. I enjoyed it ALL, the educational things (wow, decapitated head scams), the poignance, your cast of wiseguys, your well-placed use of profanity for a GOOD shock laugh, and that little dose of magic (huh, the drawn face is alive??)

Yeah, a lot of great plays ended too soon, but some I can think of (going back to Herb Gardner's Goodbye People, up through Joan Rivers' show about Sally Marr) didn't even get the good reviews to salve the pain. At least you have those, and being able to put BROADWAY on your resume (you can always say "limited run.")

I know you'll have a great time and renewed momentum taking your BROADWAY rave review show around our grand land.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts and emotions with us via this blog. Thanks for autographing the card for me (I chose that over the Playbill 'cause it had all your characters on it, in color).

And no, no point in thinking of what could've been done differently. Like what, going into the adult shops on 8th distributing "Got Wood?" buttons?

I grew up with Shari, Paul W. and the great Senor (who lived not many blocks away from the Helen Hayes) and you did their profession proud.

Anonymous said...

We love you, Jay.
I will miss seeing you and your adorable characters.
Corine Cohen
NYC

Anonymous said...

Hi Jay!

I just want to let you know Ventriloquists are proud of you for getting this show going. You have jump started an interest in ventriloquism again and that will be good for all vents.

I wish I could have seen the show, but being from Cincinnati and now living in Asia, it was impossible for me to make it to the show.

You have done a lot in the past several decades to show ventriloquism can be funny. I know this is a set back, but don't let it hurt that fire too much. You got this show not because of luck, but because you ARE one of the best out there and deserved the opportunity.

--Matt Bronsil

Anonymous said...

I saw your show twice, and had tickets to see it again in February. I'm very sad that I won't get to see you again. Won't you do a video of the show. I'd love to be able to play it over and over to cheer me up when I'm having a difficult day.
Carolyn Smith
Toms River, NJ