Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Something to hide?

I know you are as tired of this presidential election cycle as I am.  It's a good thing that ballots do not contain "none of the above" because at this point that is who's trending in my mind.
And just when you think things can't get any more absurd, to be transparent and open about his health, Donald Trump is going on the Dr. Oz show tomorrow.  I made the joke yesterday that I assumed Trump would release his tax returns on Jim Cramer's Mad Money show. The fact that Mr. Trump has made a mockery of the election process points to the fact that he will make a mockery of the Office of President if elected.

But let's get back to those tax returns.
When I apply for mortgage or refinance the first thing they ask me for is a copy of the last two years of my income tax return. I would love to say, "Proceed with the loan, I am being audited and as soon as that is over I will send them." The lenders would NOT say, "Oh sure... No problem". Rather the loan process would stop at that moment only to proceed (maybe) when I had sent the tax return.  
The mortgage banker wants that information so he/she can determine if I am able to handle a big loan.  That, along with a credit score will let them know if I am financially responsible. Now understand this is a loan that is secured with real property of equal value to the loan.  If I fall behind and really can't handle it, the people loaning me the money will take the property.  As a real estate investor and landlord I am sure that Trump never rented to someone unless they showed a copy of their tax returns. 

Okay, stay with me on this analogy.  Trump and Clinton are basically applying for the Presidency of the United States. We the people are loaning them the Presidency for a few years.  Now I have never been President, but it would seem to me that job takes a lot more responsibility than paying for a house in the suburbs. Yet one of the applicants has not shown me his tax returns so I can determine if he is fiscally responsible.  His bankruptcy's are well known, his losses publicized, which makes it more important that I determine if he is able to handle the job. Why is this not a deal breaker for the application of President? If I can't own a house without revealing my tax returns, how is it that an applicant to own the Presidency for four years is not held by the same standard.  Isn't being President a lot more important than being a home owner? 
My theory is this.  There is something in Trumps tax returns that is revealing and not flattering. There is the belief that, after four bankruptcy's, traditional financing on a large scale is not available to Mr. Trump, and he has resorted to using Russian Mob loans for his capital.  Who knows?  Trumps finances are like Schr√∂dinger's cat in quantum theory of superposition.  Right now Trump is a billionaire business man who has the golden touch and he is also a con-man crook living off the money from Russian loan sharks.  Until the box (tax return) is opened both conditions are true. 

I think there is something very fishy about his finances and Trump has no intention of ever making them available to know for sure.  He is hedging his bet.  With 8 weeks to go before we vote he would be a fool to release them now.  It would be 8 weeks of explaining, defending or dismissing the information auditors might find. If he wins.... The issue will be buried.  If he loses, then the issue is moot.  The only way he loses is if he reveals his taxes and doesn't win the Presidency.  Then when he tries to go back into the private sector everyone will know "the cat is dead". 
So Tomorrow don't expect Dr. Oz to reveal anything but "amazing results" from Trumps phantom physical. And don't expect Trump to ever release his tax returns.  And especially don't expect a President Trump to be respectful of the office, the country or "We the People."

As you were,
Jay

1 comment:

P. Grecian said...

Astute as hell. When you break it down THAT way, it makes perfect sense. Of COURSE he would never release his tax returns.
Thanks, Jay.